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Haley

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Post November 13th, 2014, 2:53 pm

Character names . . .

Do you think that the character's names or last names were intentional and were indicators of how they were (personality-wise, etc.) ?

Ex.
Severus Snape - he's a little severe
Severus Snape - he seems a little like a snake
Dumbledore - he may seem dumb because of his soft demeanor but it is only a door, which opens to a very brave and powerful wizard ?
Ronald Weasley - sort of a weasel that sneaked his way into being part of a heroic trio even though he really didn't have anything explicit to offer the team ?
Bellatrix Lestrange - she's strange
Luna Lovegood - she has a good heart
Neville Longbottom - he seems to linger at the bottom of the social totem pole. At least that seemed like that was what he was supposed to be perceived as ?
Tom Riddle - he's a riddle in his school days
Kingsley Shacklebolt - shackles as in handcuffs (even though they didn't have them in the wizarding world) indicating his status as a cop (auror). And "bolt" indicating that he's a no-nonsense kind of guy ? I don't know.
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Post November 13th, 2014, 6:42 pm

Re: Character names . . .

Definitely.

Lily Potter- Goes somehow with her personality
Luna Lovegood- Luna=Moon: She always seems to be gazing up at it...
Crabbe and Goyle- JK probably wanted to make they're names sound as gross as possible (but that they would also sound like names)
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Post November 13th, 2014, 7:04 pm

Re: Character names . . .

Haley wrote:Do you think that the character's names or last names were intentional and were indicators of how they were (personality-wise, etc.) ?

Ex.
Severus Snape - he's a little severe
Severus Snape - he seems a little like a snake
Dumbledore - he may seem dumb because of his soft demeanor but it is only a door, which opens to a very brave and powerful wizard ?
Ronald Weasley - sort of a weasel that sneaked his way into being part of a heroic trio even though he really didn't have anything explicit to offer the team ?
Bellatrix Lestrange - she's strange
Luna Lovegood - she has a good heart
Neville Longbottom - he seems to linger at the bottom of the social totem pole. At least that seemed like that was what he was supposed to be perceived as ?
Tom Riddle - he's a riddle in his school days
Kingsley Shacklebolt - shackles as in handcuffs (even though they didn't have them in the wizarding world) indicating his status as a cop (auror). And "bolt" indicating that he's a no-nonsense kind of guy ? I don't know.


I agree about the "Severus = severe" connection. It literally means "severe" in Latin. "Snape" may also relate to "snipe", or "to make a sly or petty verbal attack; shoot at someone from a hiding place, especially accurately and at long range", referring to Snape's role as a spy.

Albus Dumbledore = 'Albus' comes from 'alba', which means 'white' in Old English. Obviously, because Dumbledore has white hair and is in his old age. 'Dumbledore' to me actually sounds like a made-up magician's name, like Mad Madam Mim from Disney's "The Sword in the Stone".

Ronald Weasley = well, obviously, we have Ronald McDonald, the red-headed clown mascot of McDonald's, which may or may not have influenced JKR in Ron's conception. Both Ronald McDonald and Ron Weasley are "clowns" of sorts, with Ron albeit having very sarcastic, dry humor at points. Then, Weasley, of course, does refer to the Weasleys' tall, skinny, lean, and weasel-like physical traits. Arthur Weasley's Patronus was also, you guessed it...a weasel."Weasley" also rhymes with "measly", which means "contemptibly small or few", which could refer to the Weasleys' poverty in terms of wealth.

Bellatrix Lestrange = "Bellatrix" is obviously a mash-up of "Bella", which means "war", and "Beatrix", the latter of which means "beautiful traveller/vagabond" in Latin. Lestrange is obviously French - Le Strange - "the Strange One". From the HP Wiki: "Like many members of the House of Black, Bellatrix's name is derived from that of a star. Bellatrix is the third brightest star in the constellation Orion; it is also known as the Amazon Star. This is presumably an allusion to Bellatrix Lestrange being among the most dangerously skilled Death Eaters. The Amazons were warrior women in Greek mythology. Her name likely has Latin, French and English origins: Bella is Latin both for the plural of bellum, meaning war, and the feminine singular adjective meaning "beautiful;" trix is Latin feminine suffix (i.e. Bellatrix is the Latin word for a female warrior or a personification of feminine beauty), and Lestrange is likely a play on l'étrange, which is French meaning "the strange one". Her name thus alludes to both her beauty and her mental instability, although technically Lestrange came from Bellatrix's husband Rodolphus."

Luna Lovegood = "Luna" comes from "lunatic", or "a crazy person". Obviously, Luna is more than a bit strange, and has her quirks. The moon is also traditionally a symbol of femininity and fairies, and Luna's always saying something about "nargles", which are similar to fairies. "Lovegood" is what it means: she and her family love well.

Neville Longbottom = "Neville" is a name that originates from place names in Normandy, from the Old French Néville "Néel's estate" or Neuville, meaning "new village" or "new town". "Longbottom" could be related to Edward I of England, who was also called "Edward Longshanks". Edward I was a tall man for his era, hence the nickname "Longshanks" (long legs/lower body half, especially from the knee to the ankle). He was temperamental, and this, along with his height, made him an intimidating man, and he often instilled fear in his contemporaries. Nevertheless, he held the respect of his subjects for the way he embodied the medieval ideal of kingship, as a soldier, an administrator and a man of faith.

Tom Marvolo Riddle = A lot of people claim that his first name is "Thomas", but that's not true. It's just Tom. However, it still derives from Thomas, which means "twin". This could refer to how similar Tom is to Harry, almost like they are "twins", and the name also goes along with their wands' "twin cores". "Marvolo" may come from "marvel", or "to look at in awe and reverence; to wonder". Marvolo is most likely a variation on Malvolio, a name with Latin origins meaning "ill will", as well as a fairly famous character from Shakespeare's Twelfth Night. "Riddle" is obvious, he is quite the enigma, a puzzle to be solved - quite literally in COS.

Kingsley Shacklebolt = "Kingsley" is an English baby name. In English the meaning of the name Kingsley is: From the king's wood/meadow. Used as a first name since the 19th century. "Shacklebolt" also refers to his role as an Auror, putting dark witches and wizards behind bars, as his name quite literally means, "shackle and bolt [to lock a door]".

Too add on:

Hermione Granger = this is one of the easiest, because this is another name (aside from "Marvolo") that comes from a Shakespeare work. Namely, Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale. Or, in Greek the meaning of the name Hermione is: "Well born", referring to Hermione's ironic status as a Muggle-born. It also means "stone", referring to Hermione's unwavering loyalty, the cornerstone of Harry's efforts and fight in the war against Voldemort. It also is a feminine name derived from the Greek God of messengers, religion, and mythology - Hermes. In Greek mythology, Hermione was the daughter of King Menelaus of Sparta and Helen of Troy. "Granger" is a surname of English and French origin. It is an occupational name for a farm bailiff. The farm bailiff oversaw the collection of rent and taxes from the barns and storehouses of the lord of the manor.
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swordpixie11427

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Post November 13th, 2014, 10:37 pm

Re: Character names . . .

Oh yeah! On Pottermore she even explains some of them. I'm sure you have checked it out, but if not you should!
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Post November 13th, 2014, 11:08 pm

Re: Character names . . .

I hadn't thought about it before, but it does make sense.
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Post November 14th, 2014, 12:05 am

Re: Character names . . .

Obversa wrote:
Haley wrote:Do you think that the character's names or last names were intentional and were indicators of how they were (personality-wise, etc.) ?

Ex.
Severus Snape - he's a little severe
Severus Snape - he seems a little like a snake
Dumbledore - he may seem dumb because of his soft demeanor but it is only a door, which opens to a very brave and powerful wizard ?
Ronald Weasley - sort of a weasel that sneaked his way into being part of a heroic trio even though he really didn't have anything explicit to offer the team ?
Bellatrix Lestrange - she's strange
Luna Lovegood - she has a good heart
Neville Longbottom - he seems to linger at the bottom of the social totem pole. At least that seemed like that was what he was supposed to be perceived as ?
Tom Riddle - he's a riddle in his school days
Kingsley Shacklebolt - shackles as in handcuffs (even though they didn't have them in the wizarding world) indicating his status as a cop (auror). And "bolt" indicating that he's a no-nonsense kind of guy ? I don't know.


I agree about the "Severus = severe" connection. It literally means "severe" in Latin. "Snape" may also relate to "snipe", or "to make a sly or petty verbal attack; shoot at someone from a hiding place, especially accurately and at long range", referring to Snape's role as a spy.

Albus Dumbledore = 'Albus' comes from 'alba', which means 'white' in Old English. Obviously, because Dumbledore has white hair and is in his old age. 'Dumbledore' to me actually sounds like a made-up magician's name, like Mad Madam Mim from Disney's "The Sword in the Stone".

Ronald Weasley = well, obviously, we have Ronald McDonald, the red-headed clown mascot of McDonald's, which may or may not have influenced JKR in Ron's conception. Both Ronald McDonald and Ron Weasley are "clowns" of sorts, with Ron albeit having very sarcastic, dry humor at points. Then, Weasley, of course, does refer to the Weasleys' tall, skinny, lean, and weasel-like physical traits. Arthur Weasley's Patronus was also, you guessed it...a weasel."Weasley" also rhymes with "measly", which means "contemptibly small or few", which could refer to the Weasleys' poverty in terms of wealth.

Bellatrix Lestrange = "Bellatrix" is obviously a mash-up of "Bella", which means "war", and "Beatrix", the latter of which means "beautiful traveller/vagabond" in Latin. Lestrange is obviously French - Le Strange - "the Strange One". From the HP Wiki: "Like many members of the House of Black, Bellatrix's name is derived from that of a star. Bellatrix is the third brightest star in the constellation Orion; it is also known as the Amazon Star. This is presumably an allusion to Bellatrix Lestrange being among the most dangerously skilled Death Eaters. The Amazons were warrior women in Greek mythology. Her name likely has Latin, French and English origins: Bella is Latin both for the plural of bellum, meaning war, and the feminine singular adjective meaning "beautiful;" trix is Latin feminine suffix (i.e. Bellatrix is the Latin word for a female warrior or a personification of feminine beauty), and Lestrange is likely a play on l'étrange, which is French meaning "the strange one". Her name thus alludes to both her beauty and her mental instability, although technically Lestrange came from Bellatrix's husband Rodolphus."

Luna Lovegood = "Luna" comes from "lunatic", or "a crazy person". Obviously, Luna is more than a bit strange, and has her quirks. The moon is also traditionally a symbol of femininity and fairies, and Luna's always saying something about "nargles", which are similar to fairies. "Lovegood" is what it means: she and her family love well.

Neville Longbottom = "Neville" is a name that originates from place names in Normandy, from the Old French Néville "Néel's estate" or Neuville, meaning "new village" or "new town". "Longbottom" could be related to Edward I of England, who was also called "Edward Longshanks". Edward I was a tall man for his era, hence the nickname "Longshanks" (long legs/lower body half, especially from the knee to the ankle). He was temperamental, and this, along with his height, made him an intimidating man, and he often instilled fear in his contemporaries. Nevertheless, he held the respect of his subjects for the way he embodied the medieval ideal of kingship, as a soldier, an administrator and a man of faith.

Tom Marvolo Riddle = A lot of people claim that his first name is "Thomas", but that's not true. It's just Tom. However, it still derives from Thomas, which means "twin". This could refer to how similar Tom is to Harry, almost like they are "twins", and the name also goes along with their wands' "twin cores". "Marvolo" may come from "marvel", or "to look at in awe and reverence; to wonder". Marvolo is most likely a variation on Malvolio, a name with Latin origins meaning "ill will", as well as a fairly famous character from Shakespeare's Twelfth Night. "Riddle" is obvious, he is quite the enigma, a puzzle to be solved - quite literally in COS.

Kingsley Shacklebolt = "Kingsley" is an English baby name. In English the meaning of the name Kingsley is: From the king's wood/meadow. Used as a first name since the 19th century. "Shacklebolt" also refers to his role as an Auror, putting dark witches and wizards behind bars, as his name quite literally means, "shackle and bolt [to lock a door]".

Too add on:

Hermione Granger = this is one of the easiest, because this is another name (aside from "Marvolo") that comes from a Shakespeare work. Namely, Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale. Or, in Greek the meaning of the name Hermione is: "Well born", referring to Hermione's ironic status as a Muggle-born. It also means "stone", referring to Hermione's unwavering loyalty, the cornerstone of Harry's efforts and fight in the war against Voldemort. It also is a feminine name derived from the Greek God of messengers, religion, and mythology - Hermes. In Greek mythology, Hermione was the daughter of King Menelaus of Sparta and Helen of Troy. "Granger" is a surname of English and French origin. It is an occupational name for a farm bailiff. The farm bailiff oversaw the collection of rent and taxes from the barns and storehouses of the lord of the manor.


I actually didn't know this stuff, so I found it very interesting.
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Post November 14th, 2014, 1:01 am

Re: Character names . . .

Mr Twisted wrote:
Obversa wrote:
Haley wrote:Do you think that the character's names or last names were intentional and were indicators of how they were (personality-wise, etc.) ?

Ex.
Severus Snape - he's a little severe
Severus Snape - he seems a little like a snake
Dumbledore - he may seem dumb because of his soft demeanor but it is only a door, which opens to a very brave and powerful wizard ?
Ronald Weasley - sort of a weasel that sneaked his way into being part of a heroic trio even though he really didn't have anything explicit to offer the team ?
Bellatrix Lestrange - she's strange
Luna Lovegood - she has a good heart
Neville Longbottom - he seems to linger at the bottom of the social totem pole. At least that seemed like that was what he was supposed to be perceived as ?
Tom Riddle - he's a riddle in his school days
Kingsley Shacklebolt - shackles as in handcuffs (even though they didn't have them in the wizarding world) indicating his status as a cop (auror). And "bolt" indicating that he's a no-nonsense kind of guy ? I don't know.


I agree about the "Severus = severe" connection. It literally means "severe" in Latin. "Snape" may also relate to "snipe", or "to make a sly or petty verbal attack; shoot at someone from a hiding place, especially accurately and at long range", referring to Snape's role as a spy.

Albus Dumbledore = 'Albus' comes from 'alba', which means 'white' in Old English. Obviously, because Dumbledore has white hair and is in his old age. 'Dumbledore' to me actually sounds like a made-up magician's name, like Mad Madam Mim from Disney's "The Sword in the Stone".

Ronald Weasley = well, obviously, we have Ronald McDonald, the red-headed clown mascot of McDonald's, which may or may not have influenced JKR in Ron's conception. Both Ronald McDonald and Ron Weasley are "clowns" of sorts, with Ron albeit having very sarcastic, dry humor at points. Then, Weasley, of course, does refer to the Weasleys' tall, skinny, lean, and weasel-like physical traits. Arthur Weasley's Patronus was also, you guessed it...a weasel."Weasley" also rhymes with "measly", which means "contemptibly small or few", which could refer to the Weasleys' poverty in terms of wealth.

Bellatrix Lestrange = "Bellatrix" is obviously a mash-up of "Bella", which means "war", and "Beatrix", the latter of which means "beautiful traveller/vagabond" in Latin. Lestrange is obviously French - Le Strange - "the Strange One". From the HP Wiki: "Like many members of the House of Black, Bellatrix's name is derived from that of a star. Bellatrix is the third brightest star in the constellation Orion; it is also known as the Amazon Star. This is presumably an allusion to Bellatrix Lestrange being among the most dangerously skilled Death Eaters. The Amazons were warrior women in Greek mythology. Her name likely has Latin, French and English origins: Bella is Latin both for the plural of bellum, meaning war, and the feminine singular adjective meaning "beautiful;" trix is Latin feminine suffix (i.e. Bellatrix is the Latin word for a female warrior or a personification of feminine beauty), and Lestrange is likely a play on l'étrange, which is French meaning "the strange one". Her name thus alludes to both her beauty and her mental instability, although technically Lestrange came from Bellatrix's husband Rodolphus."

Luna Lovegood = "Luna" comes from "lunatic", or "a crazy person". Obviously, Luna is more than a bit strange, and has her quirks. The moon is also traditionally a symbol of femininity and fairies, and Luna's always saying something about "nargles", which are similar to fairies. "Lovegood" is what it means: she and her family love well.

Neville Longbottom = "Neville" is a name that originates from place names in Normandy, from the Old French Néville "Néel's estate" or Neuville, meaning "new village" or "new town". "Longbottom" could be related to Edward I of England, who was also called "Edward Longshanks". Edward I was a tall man for his era, hence the nickname "Longshanks" (long legs/lower body half, especially from the knee to the ankle). He was temperamental, and this, along with his height, made him an intimidating man, and he often instilled fear in his contemporaries. Nevertheless, he held the respect of his subjects for the way he embodied the medieval ideal of kingship, as a soldier, an administrator and a man of faith.

Tom Marvolo Riddle = A lot of people claim that his first name is "Thomas", but that's not true. It's just Tom. However, it still derives from Thomas, which means "twin". This could refer to how similar Tom is to Harry, almost like they are "twins", and the name also goes along with their wands' "twin cores". "Marvolo" may come from "marvel", or "to look at in awe and reverence; to wonder". Marvolo is most likely a variation on Malvolio, a name with Latin origins meaning "ill will", as well as a fairly famous character from Shakespeare's Twelfth Night. "Riddle" is obvious, he is quite the enigma, a puzzle to be solved - quite literally in COS.

Kingsley Shacklebolt = "Kingsley" is an English baby name. In English the meaning of the name Kingsley is: From the king's wood/meadow. Used as a first name since the 19th century. "Shacklebolt" also refers to his role as an Auror, putting dark witches and wizards behind bars, as his name quite literally means, "shackle and bolt [to lock a door]".

Too add on:

Hermione Granger = this is one of the easiest, because this is another name (aside from "Marvolo") that comes from a Shakespeare work. Namely, Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale. Or, in Greek the meaning of the name Hermione is: "Well born", referring to Hermione's ironic status as a Muggle-born. It also means "stone", referring to Hermione's unwavering loyalty, the cornerstone of Harry's efforts and fight in the war against Voldemort. It also is a feminine name derived from the Greek God of messengers, religion, and mythology - Hermes. In Greek mythology, Hermione was the daughter of King Menelaus of Sparta and Helen of Troy. "Granger" is a surname of English and French origin. It is an occupational name for a farm bailiff. The farm bailiff oversaw the collection of rent and taxes from the barns and storehouses of the lord of the manor.


I actually didn't know this stuff, so I found it very interesting.


Wikipedia plus a classical training in English Language and etymology will do that to a person. ;) Thank you!
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Monox D. I-Fly

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Post July 27th, 2017, 6:07 am

Re: Character names . . .

Haley wrote:Do you think that the character's names or last names were intentional and were indicators of how they were (personality-wise, etc.) ?

Ex.
Severus Snape - he's a little severe
Severus Snape - he seems a little like a snake
Dumbledore - he may seem dumb because of his soft demeanor but it is only a door, which opens to a very brave and powerful wizard ?
Ronald Weasley - sort of a weasel that sneaked his way into being part of a heroic trio even though he really didn't have anything explicit to offer the team ?
Bellatrix Lestrange - she's strange
Luna Lovegood - she has a good heart
Neville Longbottom - he seems to linger at the bottom of the social totem pole. At least that seemed like that was what he was supposed to be perceived as ?
Tom Riddle - he's a riddle in his school days
Kingsley Shacklebolt - shackles as in handcuffs (even though they didn't have them in the wizarding world) indicating his status as a cop (auror). And "bolt" indicating that he's a no-nonsense kind of guy ? I don't know.

With all your obsessions towards Lavender Brown, I was surprised you didn't mention her.
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MarsUltor

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Post July 27th, 2017, 11:57 am

Re: Character names . . .

Logical. J.K didn't name her characters from nothing of course.
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New Konoiche

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Post August 14th, 2017, 7:02 pm

Re: Character names . . .

Perhaps an obvious one, but Moody: He does seem a bit temperamental.
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MarsUltor

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Post August 14th, 2017, 10:09 pm

Re: Character names . . .

New Konoiche wrote:Perhaps an obvious one, but Moody: He does seem a bit temperamental.


Never thought of that but you are absolutely right.
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GellertGPhoenix

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Post August 24th, 2017, 3:59 am

Re: Character names . . .

Let's talk about Sirius BLACK, ALBUS Dumbledore, and RUBEUS Hagrid. Black, White, Red. Harry's father figures, and the people that mark his journey, particularly from an alchemical standpoint.

Or what about Remus Lupin? Minerva Mcgonagall? Voldemort?
Lots of latin origins there.
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Pensieve Seeker

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Post August 24th, 2017, 5:06 pm

Re: Character names . . .

(From John Granger) Severus Snape sounds like "sever his nape", which is how he was killed by Nagini.

Dumbledore is an old British term for bumblebee.
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Post August 26th, 2017, 2:48 pm

Re: Character names . . .

I had no idea that the adjective "lupine" existed until a few days ago when it was a question on Cash Trapped. It means wolf-like. I'm not sure how many other people noticed the connection between this and 'Lupin', who is, of course, wolf-like. I find it interesting that Lupin is Remus' surname from birth as it could suggest that he was destined, from birth, to be bitten by and become a werewolf.

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