FAQ  •  Register  •  Login

New Quidditch Teams

<<

Bucko

User avatar

The Marauder
The Marauder

Posts: 4983

Joined: January 6th, 2014, 3:40 am

Gender: Male

Post January 30th, 2016, 9:06 am

New Quidditch Teams

I've always wanted to create a US quidditch team. I've thought about it and decided to come up with a team located just outside of Chicago, IL, USA. I had a lot of fun coming up with this and if anyone has any suggestions for cities, towns or areas of the world they think need a Quidditch team, I'd be happy to write up more of these.

Spoiler: show
-Team Name: Wilmington Wolf Pack
-Hometown: Wilmington, Illinois, USA
-Founded: 1726
-League: United States League
-Logo: Two W's, parallel with one on top of the other. 4 stars above the W's symbolize their four league championships. Underneath is a "Chicago" blue Werewolf head, facing forward with red fangs.
-Robes: Red with three white stripes against two "Chicago" blue stripes on each sleeve. The crest/logo of the parallel W's and werewolf head graces the chest.
-Most Glorious Hour: Setting the record for highest total score of a quidditch game played on US soil, in a 1902 exhibition match vs the Moose Jaw Meteorites. The Wolf Pack won the match 890-740. Currently rostering the first ever set of twins in the United States League.
-Won Championships: 4 United States Cups: 1928, 1988, 2006, 2012
-Known Players: Keepers: Allen "Turnaround" Stangle (1902-1919), Edwin Bonnings (2010-Current); Seeker: Josephine Kane (2005-Current); Beaters: Thomas Francis (2010-Current), Connie Paul (2004-Current-Captain since 2006), Chasers: Johnny Taser (2014-Current), Jenny Taser (2014-Current), Anthony DeNardino (2015-Current).

-History:
The Wilmington Wolf Pack was one of the first quidditch teams to pop up on US soil. Later, with the formation of the United States League, they became won of the "Original 8" USL teams. Located about 60 miles south of Chicago, IL, Wilmington houses all the magical sports teams in its area, and happens to share some coincidental similarities to their muggle counterparts of Chicago. While Chicago is one of three cities to lend its name to two Major League Baseball teams, Wilmington is one of two cities to lend its name to two United States Quodpot teams. While the two Quodpot teams (the Wilmington Thunderbirds and the Wilmington Nogtails) boast a greater American popularity, the Wolf Pack boasts the most success of the Wilmington teams.

The rural countryside of Wilmington houses one stadium, used by all three teams. The team has one of the most controversial team names and logos in US Magical sports. While werewolves don't hold the same stigma as they do in Europe, there has been a recent push to get the team to drop the "offending" werewolf-themed name. While the fans threaten to boycott the team's games if they were to change the name, activists have recently taken to protesting at the games, and American werewolves, in general, enjoy lending their species name and image to the team and take pride in the team's success (the team has garnered werewolf fan bases across their country).

In 1902, in one of the most memorable matches in club history, the team set a record, along with the Moose Jaw Meteorites of the Canadian League, for the highest scoring game ever played on US soil. The exhibition match ended in a score of 890-740, and amazingly never saw a difference in score greater than 30 points until the snitch's capture broke a 2-hour tie for the Wolf Pack win. In one of the highest scoring matches in quidditch history, the Nordic Team narrowly lost to Scotland 1000-990 in a 6-day World Cup final. Unbelievably, the Wilminton/Moose Jaw match lasted only 16 hours, and is greatly considered the worst display of professional keeping in quidditch history. The Wilmington Keeper was rookie, Allen Stangle, playing in only his 3rd professional match. He earned the nickname "Turnaround" Stangle after this match, due to many fans joking "He never faced the right direction" or "He would have blocked more goals if he played backwards and never moved." Ironically, Allen Stangle would become one of the most celebrated Keepers in Wilmington history, with a career spanning 17 seasons. By the end of his career, he was endearingly called "Turnaround" due to his uniquely acrobatic and highly successful style of keeping.

The team won one of the first ever US Cups in 1928, but although they would field many famous US players, and enjoyed/persevered sporadically successful teams and many unsuccessful teams, it took them 60 years to win their second Cup. Recently, they have won two more Cups in the last 10 years, the two years they made the finals. They have missed the finals by one match six times during that span. Leading the current team, and a member of both the 2006 and 2012 Cup winning teams is Beater and Captain, Connie Paul, a quiet and hard working player who has never missed a match in his 12-year career. Also having played on both cup winning teams is showboat Seeker Josephine Kane, who famously has caught more snitches up-side-down than right-side-up. Thomas Francis rounds out the pair of Beaters, and is one of the tallest players in the USL, at 6'5"; he swings one of the strongest beater clubs today. Keeper Edwin Bonnings, on the other hand, is the smallest Keeper in the league, at only 5'5". Between these four players there is 35 years of professional playing experience. In great contrast, the team's three chasers are the youngest chaser unit in professional quidditch today. Twins Johnny and Jenny Taser both joined the team in 2014, and teamed up with rookie Anthony DeNardino this season to lead the Wolf Pack offense. Between the three of them, they have less than 5 years professional experience between them.
Image
>>>Image<<<
Image
>>>>>>>>... the artist formerly known as APWBD1881.<<<<<<<<
<<

Bucko

User avatar

The Marauder
The Marauder

Posts: 4983

Joined: January 6th, 2014, 3:40 am

Gender: Male

Post October 28th, 2016, 3:48 am

Re: New Quidditch Teams

Spoiler: show
Team Name: Telluride Thunderbirds
-Hometown: Telluride, Colorado, USA
-Founded: Rumored 1472, recognized 1936
-League: United States League
-Logo: A black Thunderbird silhouette with 4 wings spread to look like overlapping T’s, two small golden snitches set between each set of wings symbolize two league championships.
-Robes: Solid silver robes with a black Thunderbird head on the back about to bite onto a golden snitch. The crest/logo placed on the right side of the chest.
-Most Glorious Hour: Won back to back US Cups in their first two tournaments in the league.
-Won Championships: 2 United States Cups: 1940, 1946
-Known Players: Keeper: Malcolm Grenner (1988-Current-Captain since 2002), Seekers: “Ahtunowhiho” Willy Skychief (Around 1472?), Geoffrey Barring-Horke III (2009-Current); Beaters: Ty Muniz (2011-Current), Andrea Marquez (2004-Current), Chasers: Barry Justice (2010-Current), Michelle Jamison (2016-Current), Wayne Johnson (2009-Current).

-History:
Far to the southwest corner of the State of Colorado lays hidden Telluride, a former Victorian mining town in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Hidden further southwest of Telluride, in a box canyon high in the Rockies, at an altitude over 8,700 feet, the Telluride Thunderbirds are settled. Officially entering the United States League in 1936, this franchise, as highly secretive as the creature they are named for, claims to be the earliest magical sporting group on the North American continent. Renown American Magical Historian, Buck Genosi has confirmed that a clan of the earliest magical Native Americans were playing quidditch in the box canyons of Telluride as early as 974. When pressed on how a group of North American wizards could have been playing a game believed to be invented almost 100 years later and in Scotland, Buck defiantly states, “Well I don’t know what they were playing! But they were there! And they were playing it! And it was then!” (Read Buck Genosi’s new text “A Hippogriff Migration Explanation: How the Hippogriffs Started Here and Went There- History and Illustrations by Buck Genosi” for a better non-understanding of Buck’s confusing historical knowledge.) Likely, as the locals rumor, organized magical sports began in Telluride around 1472, when legendary Seeker “Ahtunowhiho” Willy Skychief is rumored to have brought the first group of European wizards to meet his Tribe and teach them quidditch. Ahtunowhiho is also acknowledged to have invented the strategy of seeking from near ground level, a strategy not normally employed do to the demand for looking toward the sun, but highly defensive as Bludgers cannot attack from the ground. (Known as the Ahtunowhilo Assailance)

Much controversy surrounds the Telluride Team. First, their claim to the name Thunderbirds angers many fans of the United States League, as the Thunderbird is more recognized as being native to Arizona. The Arizona team, the Taylor Jackalopes, has annually petitioned to take over the mantle of Thunderbirds unsuccessfully since 1957. (The two closest geographically quidditch teams in the United States, the Jackalopes and Thunderbird matches host some of the most violently rambunctious crowds in the League.) Second, most proud United States Wizard cannot stand the fact that their national symbol represents a team acknowledged to be the worst in the League by far. (Even the National Team will not use the Thunderbird as its logo for fear of the bad luck it could bring.) And third, the stigma surrounding their two championships.

In 1940, the Thunderbirds shocked the League by winning the Cup in their first ever tournament. Despite the constant claims from their competitors, who had never played quidditch at such high altitudes, that the Thunderbirds were not good but simply could last longer in the thin air, the Thunderbirds soared to the first ever consecutive championship for a debuting team 6 years later in 1946. After a strike by the players, demanding something be done about the incredibly thin air in the Telluride pitch, league officials enacted the Breathable Atmosphere Standard in 1950 which saw a Charm used on all United States pitches to provide a comparable level atmosphere to all pitches throughout the League. Subsequently, the Thunderbirds saw a significantly drop off in both win totals and Championships ever since. They have not had a season above .500 or seen a second round of a US Quidditch Cup since. Fans have grown to consider the two Thunderbird Cups as a black mark on the history of the league, due to the perceived unfair playing conditions the team enjoyed for the first 14 years of their existence.

The perennial bottom dwellers, being a storied albeit abysmal franchise, are hoping for a turnaround of fortunes with a mostly young team. Leading the current team, and adding to his record longest US Quidditch career Keeper and Captain, Malcolm Grenner will next year suit up for his 29th season and also holds the record for most career losses by a Keeper. Seeker Geoffrey Barring-Horke III looks to finally reach the double digits in career snitches caught this year. Beater Ty Muniz works well with seasoned Beater Andrea Marquez, the Spanish speaking beaters are the highlight of the Thunderbird Club, having been the most successful unit of the team in recent memory (They have not allowed one bludger related injury to happen in 7 years of playing together, although the fans comment they would not mind seeing a couple new faces on the club if a bludger could just sneak through). Andrea Marquez is rumored to possibly be the first Thunderbird to be named to the US National Team in 45 years. Rookie Michelle Jamison looks to revitalize a Chaser squad that has, as super-fan Jensen Rosenblatt said, “Always looked great when the Quaffle was nowhere near them.” She joins Barry Justice and Wayne Johnson, two players likely on the fast track to retirement.
Image
>>>Image<<<
Image
>>>>>>>>... the artist formerly known as APWBD1881.<<<<<<<<

Return to Flourish & Blotts

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest