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Define "Love"

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GellertGPhoenix

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Post August 31st, 2017, 12:35 am

Define "Love"

Was what Snape felt love?
What about Bellatrix? Does she love Voldemort?
Does Cho love Harry, or does she just miss Cedric?
How about Lavander and Ron?

All of these questionable pairings and more can be discussed here, and what I'm really curious of is this. In your own words, how would you describe love? What is love? (not what it isn't)
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Grrarrggh

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Post September 3rd, 2017, 9:18 pm

Re: Define "Love"

No, No, No, and, No.
Snape felt love that transformed into obsession and stayed that way.
I'm not sure Bellatrix is capable of love, but I don't know enough about her.
Cho had a teenage crush, just like Harry did.
Teenage crush x hormones + social pressure = Lavender and Ron
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ferfykins

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Post September 3rd, 2017, 9:24 pm

Re: Define "Love"

I believe snape did love Lily
As far as bellatrax i think it was more fear/respect, and possibly a slight infatuation
As for Cho, no i don't think it was love for harry or cedric
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MarsUltor

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Post September 5th, 2017, 9:53 am

Re: Define "Love"

Love is already an obsession. Snape loved Lily platonically.

I think Bellatrix loved Voldemort but it's not romantic love I suppose. Respect love if there is such a thing.

Others are teenage love, they pass over a year or two maximum.
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GinChaser

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Post September 6th, 2017, 4:29 pm

Re: Define "Love"

Snape did not love Lily platonically. Lily loved Snape platonically.
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Hannzorpannzor

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Post September 19th, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Define "Love"

GinChaser wrote:Snape did not love Lily platonically. Lily loved Snape platonically.


Agreed. I do believe, though, that Snape's guilt, both while Lily was alive and afterwards, drove his quite innocent love to become something of a crazy obsession and a need to put Lily upon a pedestal.
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GinChaser

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Post September 20th, 2017, 6:42 am

Re: Define "Love"

Hannzorpannzor wrote:
GinChaser wrote:Snape did not love Lily platonically. Lily loved Snape platonically.


Agreed. I do believe, though, that Snape's guilt, both while Lily was alive and afterwards, drove his quite innocent love to become something of a crazy obsession and a need to put Lily upon a pedestal.


Totally.
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GellertGPhoenix

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Post September 25th, 2017, 10:09 pm

Re: Define "Love"

I love how no one really answered the question.
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Grrarrggh

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Post September 26th, 2017, 4:20 am

Re: Define "Love"

love, n.1
Pronunciation:
  Brit. /lʌv/,  U.S. /ləv/
Origin: A word inherited from Germanic.
Etymology: Cognate with Old Frisian luve love, Old Saxon luƀa ... (Show More)
 I. Senses relating to affection and attachment.
 1.

 a. A feeling or disposition of deep affection or fondness for someone, typically arising from a recognition of attractive qualities, from natural affinity, or from sympathy and manifesting itself in concern for the other's welfare and pleasure in his or her presence (distinguished from sexual love at sense 4a); great liking, strong emotional attachment; (similarly) a feeling or disposition of benevolent attachment experienced towards a group or category of people, and (by extension) towards one's country or another impersonal object of affection. With of, for, to, towards.
See also brotherly love at brotherly adj. 1b, mother-love n. at mother n.1 Compounds 7.
eOE (Mercian)   Vespasian Psalter (1965) cviii. 4 (5)   Posuerunt aduersum me mala pro bonis, et odium pro dilectione mea : settun wið me yfel fore godum & laeððu fore lufan minre.
OE   West Saxon Gospels: John (Corpus Cambr.) xv. 13   Næfð nan man maran lufe þonne ðeos ys þæt hwa sylle his lif for his freondum.
c1225  (▸?c1200)    St. Juliana (Bodl.) 95 (MED)   Hire feader feng on earst feire on to lokin ȝef he mahte wið eani luue speden.
a1325  (▸c1250)    Gen. & Exod. (1968) l. 8   Man may him wel loken..Luuen god and seruen him ay..And to alle cristenei men Beren pais and luue bi-twen.
▸a1387   J. Trevisa tr. R. Higden Polychron. (St. John's Cambr.) (1865) I. 155   Wommen moste be ouercome with fairenesse and loue, and nouȝt wiþ sternesse and drede.
a1400  (▸a1325)    Cursor Mundi (Vesp.) l. 20300   Vre leuedi wep, saint iohan alsua, Treu luue was omang þam tua.
?a1425   Mandeville's Trav. (Egerton) (1889) 2   What lufe he had til his sugets.
1485   Malory's Morte Darthur (Caxton) i. viii. sig. avv   He wende that al the kynges and knyghtes had come for grete love and to have done hym worship at his feste.
1535   Bible (Coverdale) 2 Sam. i. 26   Thy loue hath bene more speciall vnto me, then the loue of wemen.
1597   T. Morley Plaine & Easie Introd. Musicke Pref.   Adiuring me by the loue of my contrie.
1598   Shakespeare Love's Labour's Lost v. ii. 415   My loue to thee is sound, sance cracke or flaw.  
1611   Bible (King James) Dan. i. 9   God had brought Daniel into fauour and tender loue with the Prince of the Eunuches.  
1680   W. Temple Ess. Orig. & Nature of Govt. in Miscellanea 89   In all these Wars the People were both united and spirited by the common Love of their Country.
1680   A. Littleton Serm. at Meeting Natives of Worcester 16   What shall we say to those who take up Godliness..as if their strictness and zeal..excused them from all offices of love to their fellow-men.
1717   T. Parnell in tr. Homer's Battle Frogs & Mice Pref. sig. A3v   This particular Knowledge..which sprung from the Love I bear him, has made me fond of a Conversation with you.
1765   W. Cowper in R. Southey Life & Wks. Cowper (1835) I. 155   My heart was full of love to all the congregation.
1817   Times 29 Dec. 2   Liberalism, the love of country, the feeling of duty, have little to do with this extraordinary division.
1818   W. Cruise Digest Laws Eng. Real Prop. (ed. 2) II. 346   The natural love which Thomas Kirby bore to his brother.
1836   W. Irving Astoria I. 279   His dominant spirit, and his love for the white men, were evinced in his latest breath.
1872   J. Morley Voltaire i. 2   They should prove their love of him whom they had not seen, by love of their brothers whom they had seen.
1912   T. Dreiser Financier xxiv. 290   He was counting practically, and man-fashion, on her love for her children.
1940   Railroad Mag. Apr. 100/1   There wasn't much about Lang Bolton you'd call human except his love for a black and white cow-dog named Rounder.
1975   T. Callender It so Happen 20   Peace and love between we and them St. Judes men? Man, you mekking mock-sport!
1990   M. Martin Keys of this Blood 42   The two seminal and ineradicable loves of any individual human being are the love of God and the love of one's native country.
2004   Smithsonian Nov. 82/2   To speculate that he was trying to surpass his father and win his mother's love, as some psychohistorians have done, is to take the easy way out.


 b. As an abstract quality or principle. (Sometimes personified.)
eOE   Cleopatra Gloss. in W. G. Stryker Lat.-Old Eng. Gloss. in MS Cotton Cleopatra A.III (Ph.D. diss., Stanford Univ.) (1951) 39   Affectu, for hylde & lufe.
c1275  (▸?a1200)    Laȝamon Brut (Calig.) (1963) 2079   He hehte þat luue [c1300 Otho: lofe] scolde liðen heom bi-tweonen.
a1400  (▸a1325)    Cursor Mundi (Vesp.) l. 99 (MED)   O reut [a1400 Fairf. petey], o loue, and charite, Was neuer hir mak.
c1400  (▸c1378)    Langland Piers Plowman (Laud 581) (1869) B. i. 146 (MED)   Trewthe telleþ þat loue is triacle of heuene.
a1500  (▸?a1425)    tr. Secreta Secret. (Lamb.) 135   Humylite Engendryth lowe that destrueth envy and hatredyn.
1557   F. Seager Schoole of Vertue in Babees Bk. (2002) i. 349   Loue doth moue the mynde to mercie.
a1628   J. Preston Breast-plate of Faith (1631) 8   Love and hatred are..the great Lords and Masters, that divide the rest of the affections between them.
1693   W. Bates Serm. Several Occasions v. 176   Human Love is a troubled irregular Passion, mixt with Ignorance, and prone to Error in the Excess or Defect.
1715   J. Barker Exilius Pref. sig. A3   Love is the Passion which generally attends Youth.
1798   J. Baillie Introd. Disc. in Series of Plays 62   Love is the chief groundwork of almost all our tragedies and comedies.
1809   S. T. Coleridge Notebks. (2002) III. 70   Love is a desire of the whole being to be united to some thing, or some being, felt necessary to its completeness.
1911   Ld. H. Tennyson Tennyson & Friends 122   He liked home-thrusts at human foibles and frailty, and again the outwelling of native nobility, generosity, or love.
1941   V. Woolf Between Acts 92   Love. Hate. Peace. Three emotions made the ply of human life.
1999   J. Wood Broken Estate 181   At its highest levels, the novelist's ability to penetrate the otherness of his characters is indistinguishable from love.

 c. As a count noun: an instance of affection or fondness. Also: †an act of kindness (obs.).
OE   Resignation B 116   Þonne ic me to fremþum freode hæfde, cyðþu gecwe[me] me wæs a cearu symle lufena to leane, swa ic alifde nu.
a1225  (▸?c1175)    Poema Morale (Trin. Cambr.) 314 in R. Morris Old Eng. Homilies (1873) 2nd Ser. 229 (MED)   Alle godel [read godes] laȝes hie fulleð..Þe þe þos two luues [v.rr. two loue, twa luue, two luuen] halt and wile hes wel healde.
a1450   Pater Noster Richard Ermyte (Westm. Sch. 3) 11   Alle þe loues þat euere were, or þat euere hadde fadir or modir to here childer.
1548   Hall's Vnion: Richard III vi. f. liiijv   All these loues, bondes and deuties of necessite are this daie to be experimented, shewed and put in experience.
1573   G. Gascoigne Hundreth Sundrie Flowres 330   No such trustlesse flood, Should keepe our loues (long time) in twayne.
a1616   Shakespeare King John (1623) iv. i. 49   What good loue may I performe for you?  
1632   W. Lithgow Totall Disc. Trav. v. 189   I met with an English ship..whose loues I cannot easily forget.
1695   J. Norris Lett. conc. Love of God x. 233   We are therefore to cast both these Loves into one and the same Chanel, and make them both flow in one full Current towards God.
1733   Pope Ess. Man ii. 35   We learn..those Joys, those Loves, those Int'rests to resign.
1795   C. Lloyd Poems on Var. Subj. 50   Those friendships, those loves, those emotions so dear, That thrill the young mind.
a1853   F. W. Robertson Lect. & Addr. Lit. & Social Topics (1858) i. 25   The same feelings and anxieties and loves.
1934   in ‘L. G. Gibbon’ Grey Granite ii. 77   An antrin magic that bound you in one with the mind, not only the body of a man, with his dreams and desires, his loves, even hates.
a1968   T. Merton tr. Meng Tzu Ox Mountain Parable ii, in Coll. Poems (1977) 971   The moisture of the dawn spirit Awakens in us the right loves, the right aversions.
2002   Philadelphia Weekly 17 Apr. 34/2   The movie soundtrack has become the new hip canvas for artists to flex their cinematic loves and leanings.

†d. In Old English (contrasted with lagu law): amicable or peaceable settlement (as opposed to litigation). Hence (in later use) occasionally rendering Latin foedus treaty, covenant. Obs.
under love and law: denoting the position of being a member of a frankpledge.
lOE   Laws of Æðelred II (Rochester) iii. xiii. §3. 232   Þar þegen age twegen costas, lufe oððe lage, & he þonne lufe geceose, stande þæt swa fæst swa se dom.
a1325  (▸c1250)    Gen. & Exod. (1968) l. 635   God gat it: a token of luuen [Genesis 9:12: signum fœderis] Taunede him in ðe wakene a-buuen, Rein-bowe, men cleped, reed and blo.
?a1475  (▸?a1425)    tr. R. Higden Polychron. (Harl. 2261) (1869) II. 347   The gentiles vsede to caste downe the bloode of a sowe in to a signe of luffe.
?a1475  (▸?a1425)    tr. R. Higden Polychron. (Harl. 2261) (1872) IV. 123   He..was receyvede in to the frendschippe of the Romanes, and the forme of the luffe and convention made was wryten in tables of brasse.
?a1475  (▸?a1425)    tr. R. Higden Polychron. (Harl. 2261) (1865) I. 99   Hit [sc. Oreb] is called also the mownte of fere and of luffe [L. mons terroris et fœderis].
c1503   R. Arnold Chron. f. xxxij/1   Yf ther bee ony persone wythin the warde that is not vnder francpledge that is to saye vndir loue and lawe.

 2. In religious use: the benevolence and affection of God towards an individual or towards creation; (also) the affectionate devotion due to God from an individual; regard and consideration of one human being towards another prompted by a sense of a common relationship to God. Cf. charity n. 1.
In theological discourse the love of complacency  [after post-classical Latin amor complacentiae (a1350 in a British source)] implies approval of qualities in the object, whilst the love of benevolence  [after post-classical Latin amor benevolentiae (13th cent.; a1350 in a British source)] is bestowed irrespective of the character of the object.
OE (Northumbrian)   Lindisf. Gospels: John v. 42   Sed cognoui uos quia dilectionem dei non habetis in uobis: ah ic cuðe iuih þætte lufu godes [OE Rushw. lufo godes] ne habbas gie in iuih.
a1225  (▸?a1200)    MS Trin. Cambr. in R. Morris Old Eng. Homilies (1873) 2nd Ser. 141   Ure drihten..forgiaf hire hire sinnen, for two þinge, an is muchel leððe to hire sunne, oðer muchel luue to him.
c1325   in K. Böddeker Altengl. Dichtungen (1878) 201 (MED)   Suete loue þe dude gredyn.
a1500  (▸1465)    Vision E. Leversedge in Notes & Queries Somerset & Dorset (1905) 9 34   In the name of our Lord Jhesu Crist and for that lof that he had vn to ȝou in the tyme of his passion.
1526   Bible (Tyndale) 1 John v. 3   This is the love of god, that we kepe his commaundementes.
1611   Bible (King James) 1 John iv. 16   God is loue, and hee that dwelleth in loue, dwelleth in God.  
a1629   W. Pinke Trial of Christians Sincere Loue Christ (1636) 84   Lastly, it will not be amisse to obserue two things of this loue of complacency arising from a perswasion of Christs loue vnto vs in particular.
1648   S. Rutherford Surv. Spirituall Antichrist xix. 20   We teach that the love of benevolence and good will is the liking, free delight, and choise of the person to glory, and to all the meanes, even to share in Christs Mediatory love.
1720   D. Manley Power of Love i. 71   Then it was, that she felt the Love of God.
1796   S. T. Coleridge Relig. Musings in Poems Var. Subj. 153   Lord of unsleeping Love, From everlasting Thou!
1836   J. Gilbert Christian Atonem. viii. 308   The death of Christ was the expression of Divine love.
1860   C. H. Spurgeon New Park St. Pulpit VI. 181-9   When Adam sinned, though God was merciful, he could not show love to one who had become a rebel; I mean—not the love of complacency—though the love of benevolence never ceased for a moment.
1876   J. B. Mozley Serm. preached Univ. of Oxf. ii. 29   Love in the Gospel sense is that general virtue which covers the motives.
1925   Woman's World (Chicago) Apr. 65/2   Teaching their children the love and fear of God and the joy of tasks well done.
1955   R. B. Braithwaite Empiricist's View Relig. Belief 18   Unless a Christian's assertion that God is love (agape)..be taken to declare his intention to follow an agapeistic way of life, he could be asked what is the connexion between the assertion and the intention.
1978   I. B. Singer Shosha xiv. 243   To me..you are my rebbe. Your every word is filled with wisdom and love of God as well.
2002   N. Drury Dict. Esoteric 295/1   In Sufism, total submission to Allah and love for him leads to the attainment of spiritual truth.

 3. Strong predilection, liking, or fondness (for something); devotion (to something). With of, for (also †to, †unto); in Old English also with the genitive.
†to give (also bear) love to: to be devoted or addicted to.
eOE   tr. Bede Eccl. Hist. (Tanner) iv. xxviii. 362   Swa mycel getydnes & gelærednes to sprecenne & swa mycel lufu godcundre lare [OE Corpus Oxf. swa mycel lufu to godcundre lare; L. tantus amor persuadendi].
eOE   King Ælfred tr. Boethius De Consol. Philos. (Otho) xxxv. 101   Ne fo we no & [read on] ða bisna & on ða bispel for ðara leasena spella lufan, ac forðæmðe we woldon mid gebecnan þa soðfæstnesse.
a1325  (▸c1250)    Gen. & Exod. (1968) l. 4067   And for luue of ðis horeplage, Manie for-leten godes lage.
▸a1398   J. Trevisa tr. Bartholomaeus Anglicus De Proprietatibus Rerum (BL Add.) f. 317   Also þe bere loueþ hony most of ony þing, and he brekeþ trees & clymbeþ on trees for loue of hony combes.
a1500  (▸?a1425)    tr. Secreta Secret. (Lamb.) 218   Philosophie is no more but loue of witte and cvnnynge.
1548   Hall's Vnion: Edward IV f. ccxxxviiv   Blynde auarice and loue of money.
1611   M. Smith in Bible (King James) Transl. Pref. 2   For the loue that he bare vnto peace.
1688   W. Smith Future World ii. i. 113   Take notice how sillily one man manageth his love of Money.
1726   Pope in tr. Homer Odyssey V. Postscr. 278   Let our love to Antiquity be ever so great.
1773   H. Chapone Lett. Improvem. Mind II. 32   The love of truth, and a real desire of improvement.
1839   W. H. Ainsworth Jack Sheppard I. i. i. 7   Under the name, traced in charcoal, appeared the following record of the poor fellow's fate, ‘Hung himsel in this rum for luv off licker’.
1877   W. E. Gladstone in 19th Cent. Nov. 547   The love of freedom itself is hardly stronger in England than the love of aristocracy.
1887   T. Fowler Princ. Morals ii. i. 11   Among these primary desires should be specified the love of ease and the love of occupation.
1888   C. Patmore in B. Champneys Mem. (1900) II. iv. 43   When I was about fifteen my love for poetry began to get the better of my love for science.
1911   I. M. Pagan From Pioneer to Poet ii. 31   The burlesque Taurean is fat, thick-necked, gross and overfed looking, and often has a great love of low comedy.
1952   ‘R. Gordon’ Doctor in House i. 9   His love for his old hospital, like one's affection for the youthful homestead, increased steadily with the length of time he had been shot of it.
1987   E. Feinstein Captive Lion iii. 64   Marina's interest in gypsies was part of her love of everything exotic.
2006   Vertical Dec. 72/2   Para-alpinists and climbers share a love of the environment and all that is steep.

 a. An intense feeling of romantic attachment based on an attraction felt by one person for another; intense liking and concern for another person, typically combined with sexual passion. Cf. true love n. 1.
OE   Old Eng. Hexateuch: Gen. (Claud.) xxix. 20   Iacob him hyrsumode þa seofan gear for Rachele, & hit him þuhte feawa daga for þære lufe þe he to hyre hæfde [L. prae amoris magnitudine].
c1225  (▸?c1200)    Hali Meiðhad (Bodl. 34) (1940) l. 479 (MED)   Forte drahen his luue towart hire.
?a1300   Dame Sirith in G. H. McKnight Middle Eng. Humorous Tales (1913) 1   Reste neuede he non, Þe loue wes so strong.
a1413  (▸c1385)    Chaucer Troilus & Criseyde (Pierpont Morgan) (1881) ii. l. 667   This was a sodeyn loue, how myght it be That she so lyghtly louede Troylus Right for þe firste syghte ye parde.
a1413  (▸c1385)    Chaucer Troilus & Criseyde (Pierpont Morgan) (1881) i. 508   Now art þow yn þe snare That whilom Iapedest at loues peyne.
c1450  (▸?a1400)    Wars Alexander (Ashm.) 226 (MED)   Þe lede lawid in hire lofe as leme dose of gledis.
▸?a1513   W. Dunbar Poems (1998) I. 101   I hard a merle with mirry notis sing A sang of lufe.
a1593   Marlowe Hero & Leander (1598) i. 175   Where both deliberat, the loue is slight, Who euer lov'd, that lov'd not at first sight?
1667   Milton Paradise Lost iv. 750   Haile wedded Love, mysterious Law, true sourse Of human ofspring.  
1691   R. Ames (title of poem)    The pleasures of love and marriage.
1738   J. Hildebrand Tryal of Conjugal Love i. 45   A Wife's Conjugal Love may..be try'd a little farther, than, in Conscience, it ought to be.
1769   F. Brooke Hist. Emily Montague II. cxx. 220   She opened to me all her heart on the subject of her love for Rivers.
a1849   E. A. Poe Annabel Lee in Coll. Wks. (1969) I. 477   We loved with a love that was more than love—I and my Annabel Lee.
1872   O. Logan Get thee behind me, Satan! 272   The woman who dares to put her heart out of the question, and without a thought of love to sell herself to a man whose material wealth she desires to share is—to put it mildly—a trafficker.
1950   W. Durant Age of Faith xxv. 702   At his court troubadours were encouraged to sing the joys and pains of love.
1979   B. Bainbridge Another Part of Wood vii. 133   Love does exist... All I know is it passes off.
2000   Daily Tel. 4 Apr. 15/2   Today, it seems obligatory that if you want to describe love you have to have two people humping around in a bed.
 
 b. An instance of being in love. Also in pl.: love affairs, amatory relations.
1561   T. Hoby tr. B. Castiglione Courtyer iii. sig. Ii.i v   M. Francis Petrarca, that writt so diuinlye his loues in this oure tunge.
1589   G. Puttenham Arte Eng. Poesie iii. xxiii. 225   Nothing is so vnpleasant to a man, as to be encountred in his chiefe affection, & specially in his loues.
1590   Spenser Faerie Queene i. ii. sig. B3   Like a young Squire, in loues and lusty hed His wanton daies that euer loosely led.
a1616   Shakespeare Othello (1622) v. ii. 43   Oth. Thinke on thy sinnes. Des. They are loues I beare to you.  
1697   Dryden tr. Virgil Georgics iv, in tr. Virgil Wks. 137   All the Rapes of Gods, and ev'ry Love, From ancient Chaos down to youthful Jove.  
1738   Swift Compl. Coll. Genteel Conversat. 103   I suppose, the Colonel was cross'd in his first Love.
1767   R. Bentley Philodamus iv. ii. 42   Her loves with Bacchus, and her stellar wreath, Are allegorical, and mean no more Than the song tells us.
1844   B. Disraeli Coningsby III. viii. ii. 202   The sweet pathos of their mutual loves.
1849   G. P. R. James Woodman I. ii. 9   Tapestry..representing..the loves of Mars and Venus..did not in those days at all shock the inhabitants of the nunnery.
1895   A. Douglas Let. in H. M. Hyde Trials Oscar Wilde (1948) 360   There are several women in London whose friendship with other women does carry a taint and a suspicion, simply because these women are obviously ‘sapphic’ in their loves.
1933   D. Thomas Let. ?21 Dec. (1987) 67   You..dwell, unhappily but unbrokenly, upon the passing of juvenile loves.
1974   I. Murdoch Sacred & Profane Love Machine 81   Oh my sweetikin, how can such a love as ours stop?
2003   Knoxville (Tennessee) News-Sentinel (Nexis) 20 June (Weekend section) 13   The Carrie-Jack relationship doesn't have the spark of her past loves.
 
 c. The motif of romantic love in imaginative literature.
1717   G. Sewell Prol. in S. Centlivre Cruel Gift sig. A5v   This is her first attempt in Tragick-Stuff; And here's Intrigue, and Plot, and Love enough.
1781   Johnson Addison in Pref. Wks. Eng. Poets V. 46   The greatest weakness of the play is in the scenes of love... Yet the Love is..intimately mingled with the whole action.
1860   Macaulay William Pitt in Biogr. (2nd par.)   This piece..is in some respects highly curious. There is no love. The whole plot is political.
1892   Black & White 22 Oct. 476/1   [The] story turns..on murder and revenge, with a little love thrown in.
1932   B. L. Suzuki Nōgaku 19   A romantic play (jo or katsuramono), in which the chief character is a woman and the chief motive love.
1949   F. Towers Tea with Mr. Rochester (1952) 30   Must she also have a beautiful mind, to set her above other people and make her so fastidious that she wouldn't even let one got to a cinema or read a book with love in it?

 5. Sexual desire or lust, esp. as a physiological instinct; amorous sexual activity, sexual intercourse. Cf. to make love at Phrases 3a.
OE   Old Eng. Martyrol. (Corpus Cambr. 196) 22 Nov. 254   On þære nyhte þa heo wæs ingelæded on þone brydbur, þa sæde heo þam brydguman þæt heo gesawe engel of heofenum and se wolde hyne slean myd færdeaðe, gif he hyre æfre onhryne myd unclænre lufon.
a1300  (▸a1250)    Physiologus 514   In boke is ðe turtres lif writen o rime, Wu laȝelike ȝe holdeð luue al hire lif-time.
▸a1387   J. Trevisa tr. R. Higden Polychron. (St. John's Cambr.) (1874) V. 185   A ȝongelynge..þat hadde obleged hym self to the devel for þe love of a wenche.
c1480  (▸a1400)    St. Vincent 13 in W. M. Metcalfe Legends Saints Sc. Dial. (1896) II. 259   Fals erroure, & lufe vnclene, & warldis dout als.
1567   in J. Cranstoun Satirical Poems Reformation (1891) I. iv. 28   Hir licherous luife, quhilk kindlit ouer hait.
a1568   A. Scott Poems (1896) 27   A leddy als, for luf, to tak Ane propir page, hir tyme to pass.
1611   Bible (King James) Prov. vii. 18   Come, let vs take our fill of loue vntill the morning.  
1697   Dryden tr. Virgil Georgics iii, in tr. Virgil Wks. 99   Six Seasons use; but then release the Cow, Unfit for Love, and for the lab'ring Plough.  
1762   Ld. Kames Elements Crit. I. ii. 60   Animal love when exerted into action by natural impulse singly, is neither social nor selfish.
?1775   J. Lamb Poet. Pieces on Several Occasions 62   Lustful Love, inflamed had his Dame, She for him burn'd with an unlawful flame.
1828   J. Stark Elements Nat. Hist. II. 272   Both sexes, in the season of love, have the habit of calling one another by striking rapidly with their mandibles on the wood.
1860   W. Wallace Epicureanism vii. 131   It is not an unbroken succession of drinking feasts and of revelry, not the pleasures of sexual love,..which produce a pleasant life.
1925   W. Lewis Foxes' Case in Cal. Mod. Lett. Oct. 77   Ectogenetic birth will shortly supersede the present brutal rigmarole of animal love.
1965   New Statesman 1 Oct. 493/3   A straggly-bearded, myopic agitator earning a free night of love with Annie Girardot's golden-hearted whore.
1990   Boston Phoenix 27 Apr. b1/1   In an age when the lingering concept of free love collides with the call for safe sex, S/M is as popular as ever.
 
 6.
 a. A person who is beloved of another, esp. a sweetheart (cf. true love n. 4a); also (rare) in extended use of animals. Cf. lady-love n. 1.
c1225  (▸?c1200)    St. Katherine (Bodl. 34) (1981) 557   He is mi lif ant mi luue.
c1400  (▸c1378)    Langland Piers Plowman (Laud 581) (1869) B. iv. 49   Rose, Reginoldes loue [c1400 A text lemmon].
c1450  (▸1369)    Chaucer Bk. Duchess (Fairf. 16) (1871) l. 91   And where my lord my loue be deed?
▸a1470   Malory Morte Darthur (Winch. Coll. 13) (1990) I. 359   He is my fyrste love and he shal be the laste.
a1593   Marlowe Passionate Sheepheard in Englands Helicon (1600) sig. Aav   Come liue with mee, and be my loue.
1600   Shakespeare Merchant of Venice iv. i. 274   Whether Bassanio had not once a loue .  
c1606   G. Wither Love Sonn. iii, in Descr. Love (1638) C 4   In Summer-time to Medley My love and I would goe.
1689   N. Lee Princess of Cleve i. iii. 10   With the Curtains half drawn, My Love and I lay.
1697   Dryden tr. Virgil Æneis viii, in tr. Virgil Wks. 442   One Heifar who had heard her Love complain, Roar'd from the Cave.
1729   H. Carey Poems (ed. 3) 135   I'll strip the Garden and the Grove, To make a Garland for my Love.
1772   W. Jones Poems 43   Told to their smiling loves their am'rous tales.
1792   J. Wolcot Wks. III. 259   Her feather'd Partner..Now for his loves pursues his airy way, And now with food returns.
1819   Scott Bride of Lammermoor ii, in Tales of my Landlord 3rd Ser. III. 19   It is best to be off wi' the old love Before you be on wi' the new.
a1822   Shelley Charles I v, in Wks. (1870) II. 394   A widow bird sate mourning for her love Upon a wintry bough.
1870   F. W. H. Myers Poems 92   She and her love,—how dimly has she seen him Dark in a dream and windy in a wraith!
1900   J. M. Barrie Tommy & Grizel xxv. 303   There are poor dogs of men..who open their letters from their loves, knowing exactly what will be in them.
1926   T. Hardy Coll. Poems (ed. 2) 126   When I've overgot The world somewhat, When things cost not Such stress and strain, Is soon enough..To tell my Love I am come again.
1955   R. S. Thomas Song at Year's Turning 31   Your love is dead, lady, your love is dead.
1995   Independent 11 Feb. 33/3   When we celebrate St Valentine's on Tuesday, I am hoping my love will join me in a Waggle Dance.

 b. As a form of address to one's beloved and (in modern informal use) also familiarly to a close acquaintance or (more widely) anyone whom one encounters. Frequently with possessive adjective.
c1405  (▸c1387–95)    Chaucer Canterbury Tales Prol. (Hengwrt) (2003) l. 672   Ful loude he soong com hyder loue [1477 Glasgow my loue] to me.
a1500  (▸?c1300)    Bevis of Hampton (Chetham) l. 2019   Beuys, loue dere, Ryde nat fro me in no manere!
1600   Wisdome Doctor Dodypoll iii. sig. D4   Why loue, doubt you that?
1600   Wisdome Doctor Dodypoll iii. sig. E4   Thou art growne passing strange, my loue.
1642   Fourtie Articles against W. Lang 8   That the said Lang doth affirm that the Book of Canticles in the Old Testament was but a kind of baudy Song, My Love, my Dove, my faire one, &c.
1757   D. Garrick Isabella iv. 35   No more, my Love, complaining of the past, We lose the present Joy.
1795   S. T. Coleridge Lines at Shurton Bars 85   How oft, my Love! with shapings sweet I paint the moment, we shall meet!
1812   T. Moore Young May Moon in Irish Melodies III. v. 18   The young May moon is beaming, love.
1860   C. Patmore Faithful for Ever iii. ii. 180   And there's another thing, my Love, I wish you'd show you don't approve.
1895   A. W. Pinero Second Mrs. Tanqueray iii. 104   Paula love, I fancied you and Aubrey were a little more friendly.
1920   ‘K. Mansfield’ Let. 17 Jan. (1993) III. 182   You were not made of steel. Oh, my Love, was I so heavy?
1957   J. Braine Room at Top vi. 52   T'lad's cum to enjoy hisen, 'aven't you, luv?
1966   New Yorker 29 Jan. 22/3   ‘Sit over here, love,’ he said as another actress entered.
1968   A. Clarke Darkened Room x. 126   The nurses called me ‘Luv’ or ‘Dear’.
1991   J. Cartwright To 1   Landlady: Stuff it man. (To customer.) Yes love can I help you?
2002   C. Newland Snakeskin ii. 23   The chance was too good to miss, luv.
 
†c. In reference to illicit relations: a paramour or lover (applied to both men and women). Obs.
c1405  (▸c1385)    Chaucer Knight's Tale (Hengwrt) (2003) l. 1448   Ne neuere wol I be no loue ne wyf.
?a1425  (▸c1400)    Mandeville's Trav. (Titus C.xvi) (1919) 103   Whan þei [sc. Amazons] wil haue ony companye of man..þan þei [have] here loues [?a1425 Egerton lemmans; Fr. amys] þat vsen hem.
1462   W. Barker in Paston Lett. & Papers (2004) II. 277   He bydeth but a tyme þat he myght gete a summe of money to-geders..and to gon ther-with with a love of his soiornyng as yette in Hokehold.
1565   T. Cooper Thesaurus at Siue   Wheather this be his wyfe, or his loue, great with childe she is by Pamphilus.
1602   Shakespeare Merry Wives of Windsor iii. v. 73   To search for his wiues loue.
1613   S. Purchas Pilgrimage 768   They haue one wife, many loues.
1636   H. Blount Voy. Levant 14   Each Basha hath as many or like more Catamites, which are their serious loves; for their Wives are used..for reputation.

 d. gen. An object of love; a person who or thing which is loved, the beloved (of); a passion, preoccupation. See also first love n. (d) at first adj., adv., and n.2 Special uses 2b.
1734   Pope Ess. Man: Epist. IV 180   The Lover, and the Love, of Human kind.
1754   Earl of Chatham Lett. to Nephew (1804) iv. 28   Make yourself the love and admiration of the world.
1818   Byron Childe Harold: Canto IV clxx. 88   In the dust The fair-haired Daughter of the Isles is laid, The love of millions.
1887   W. Carleton Farm Legends 94   He vaulted 'mongst the nation's honored sons; He was the love of all the living ones.
1968   L. Blanch Journey into Mind's Eye xii. 168   His last link with Princess Eliza Vorontzova who had been the love of his youth, of his life, it was said.
1976   D. Francis In Frame vi. 679   He'd missed weeks in the summer for his other love, which was sailing.
2000   N. Braybrooke in ‘I. English’ Every Eye Pref. p. x   His second love was sailing—but, there again, he felt he could never be a crack helmsman.

 e. colloq. A charming or delightful person or thing.
1814   J. Austen Let. 23 Aug. (1995) 270   The Garden is quite a Love.
1831   Countess Granville Let. 28 Feb. (1894) II. 91   A pretty, tiny daughter, whom my girls think a love.
1837   L. Hunt Blue-stocking Revels i, in Poet. Wks. (1844) 103   Such doves of Petitions, and loves of sweet Pray'rs.
1841   S. Warren Ten Thousand a-Year II. 75   He's a love of a man, pa, isn't he?
1864   W. H. Ainsworth John Law I. Prol. vi. 76   Nankin has the tiniest teacups you ever beheld—perfect loves!
1889   ‘R. Boldrewood’ Robbery under Arms xxiv   What a love of a chain!
1936   ‘N. Blake’ Thou Shell of Death xiii. 230   Ah, a dotey little love she was.
1970   Reno (Nevada) Evening Gaz. 19 May 32/1   ‘What a love of a place!’ exclaimed prospective bride Vicki Scrivner.
1972   A. Bennett Getting On ii. 36   Be a love, Geoff, and tell them a story.
2002   Sunday Mirror (Nexis) 17 Feb. 7   Winston, her bulldog, pads in from the next room... ‘Isn't he a cutie, isn't he a love?’
 
 7.
 a. Now with capital initial. The personification of romantic or sexual affection, usually portrayed as masculine, and more or less identified with the Eros, Amor, or Cupid of Classical mythology (formerly sometimes feminine, and capable of being identified with Venus). See also Phrases 6b.
c1325   in T. Wright Specimens Lyric Poetry (1842) xvi. 53   To love y putte pleyntes mo.
c1325   in G. L. Brook Harley Lyrics (1968) 50 (MED)   To Loue, þat leflich is in londe, y tolde him..hou þis hende haþ hent..on huerte þat myn wes.
a1425  (▸c1385)    Chaucer Troilus & Criseyde (1987) i. 353   For love bigan his fetheres so to lyme.
▸1435   R. Misyn tr. R. Rolle Fire of Love 102   Weil it is sayd in play: ‘luf gos before & ledis þe dawns.’
1566   W. Painter Palace of Pleasure I. xxxvii. f. 86v   Notwithstanding dame Loue is so fauourable vnto me.
1598   Shakespeare Love's Labour's Lost iv. iii. 356   Forerunne faire Loue, strewing her way with flowers.  
1667   Milton Paradise Lost iv. 763   Here Love his golden shafts imploies, here lights His constant Lamp, and waves his purple wings.  
1697   D. Baker Poems upon Several Occas. i. 5   Cruel Love..makes thy faithless Vows serve for a StoneTo whet his bloody Darts upon.
1720   D. Manley Power of Love iv. 230   Love..had long owed him a Revenge for slighting and speaking irreverently of his Power.
1770   F. Gentleman Sultan v. i. 64   There is but one, one only pow'r, Almighty love, who could such tribute claim.
1805   Scott Lay of Last Minstrel iii. ii. 66   In peace, Love tunes the shepherd's reed; In war, he mounts the warrior's steed.
1859   E. FitzGerald tr. Rubáiyát Omar Khayyám lxxiii. 16   Ah Love! could thou and I with Fate conspire.
1889   W. Allingham Life & Phantasy 7   Who could say that Love is blind? Piercing-sighted, he will find A thousand subtle charms that lie Hid from every common eye.
1913   E. Ferber Roast Beef Medium x. 263   There shall be no running breathless, flushed, eager-eyed, to the very gateway of Love's garden.
1952   Musical Q. 38 622   Death, using Love's arrows, causes tottering gammers and gaffers to become youthfully enamoured of each other.
2001   A. Shakar Savage Girl 153   Then the chip in my left brain crunched all the data,..and I told him, ‘Awake: Love is calling you’.

 b. In pl. Representations or personifications of Cupid; mythological gods of love, or attendants of the goddess of love; figures or representations of the god of love. Frequently with modifying word.
1595   Spenser Amoretti xvi, in Amoretti & Epithalamion sig. Bv   Legions of loues with little wings did fly.
1608   B. Jonson Characters Two Royall Masques ii. 12   A world of little Loues, and chast Desires, Do light their [sc. the Muses'] beauties, with still mouing fires.
a1667   A. Cowley Verses Several Occasions 14 in Wks. (1668)    All around The little Loves that waited by, Bow'd, and blest the Augurie.
1734   Swift Strephon & Cloe in Beautiful Young Nymph 10   The smiling Cyprian Goddess brings Her infant Loves with purple Wings.
?1793   S. T. Coleridge Lines Autumnal Evening 49   A thousand Loves around her forehead fly; A thousand Loves sit melting in her eye.
a1839   W. M. Praed Poems (1864) II. 63   Where'er her step in beauty moves, Around her fly a thousand loves.
1866   A. C. Swinburne Sapphics in Poems & Ballads 206   The Loves thronged sadly with hidden faces Round Aphrodite.
a1891   A. Pike Poems (1900) 52   Let all the Loves Fly round thy chariot, with sweet, low songs Murmuring upon their lips.
1928   E. Strong Art in Anc. Rome II. xii. 40   The little loves riding on panthers and donkeys..are examples of that art of cælatura which aroused the enthusiasm of Pliny.
1966   Jrnl. Warburg & Courtauld Inst. 29 441   A great company of winged loves fly after her [sc. Venus].
1998   Early Music 26 253   In The Haddington Masque a month later, little Loves escort Cupid as his torchbearers.

 II. Senses relating to games of skill or chance.
†8. A game of chance of Italian origin in which one player holds up a certain number of fingers, and another simultaneously guesses their number; = morra n.   Frequently in the play of love. Obs.
 [Apparently after Middle French iouer à l'amour, lit. ‘to play at love’ (see quot. 1585), apparently a folk-etymological alteration of iouer à la mourre   to play morra (see morra n., and compare quot. 1653).]
1585   J. Higgins tr. Junius Nomenclator 297/2   Micare digitis,..iouer à l'amour,..a play vsed in Italy,..it is called there, & in France and Spaine, the play of loue.
1611   R. Cotgrave Dict. French & Eng. Tongues   Mourre, the play of loue.
1653   T. Urquhart tr. Rabelais 1st Bk. Wks. xxii. 94   There he played..At love [Fr. a la mourre].
1725   N. Bailey tr. Erasmus Colloq. 205   The Countrymens Play of holding up our Fingers (dimicatione digitorum, i.e. the Play of Love).
 
 9.
 a. In various competitive games of skill, esp. tennis, squash, bridge, and whist: no score, (a score of) nothing, nil. Frequently in various formulaic expressions indicating the score of two contestants in a game (as fifteen love, six love, etc.).
love-all: no score (yet) on either side (see also all adv. 10).
 
 [Perhaps originally developed from the expression for love at Phrases 1e. For a variety of other suggestions see American Notes & Queries 2 (1963) 8–9, B. Oreström in B. Odenstedt & G. Persson (eds.) Instead of Flowers: Papers in Honour of Mats Rydén on the Occasion of his Sixtieth Birthday (1989) 175–7.]
1742   E. Hoyle Short Treat. Game Whist i. 13   If your Adversary is 6 or 7 Love, and you are to lead.
1780   Gentleman's Mag. 50 322/2   We are not told how, or by what means Six love comes to mean Six to nothing.
1797   Encycl. Brit. XVIII. 380/2   As the games are won, so they are marked and called; as one game love, two games to one, &c.
1816   Jrnl. Cork. Hist. & Archaeol. Soc. (1901) 7 151   Mr Cashell was eight to love of the first game.
1885   Pall Mall Gaz. 2 Mar. 10/2   In the Rugby game Northampton beat Coventry by a try to love.
1898   Earl of Suffolk et al. Encycl. Sport II. 242/1   The marker's..duty is to call the game..from the start at ‘love all’... ‘Love’, in the game of rackets, as in other games, signifies nothing.
1906   W. Dalton ‘Saturday’ Bridge ii. 53   When you hold six or more cards of a black suit, thoroughly established, and one other card of entry, No Trumps should always be declared at the score of love.
1929   M. C. Work Compl. Contract Bridge p. xv   Any advice given for bidding, raising, etc., applies when the score is ‘love-all’.
1974   Los Angeles Times 20 Sept. iii. 1/1   When you get beat six games to love, it's called ‘The Bagel’.
1995   S. E. Grace in M. Lowry Sursum Corda! I. 624   ‘Love fifteen’ and ‘advantage out’ are scoring terms in tennis.

Is that better?
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Post September 30th, 2017, 7:35 pm

Re: Define "Love"

GellertGPhoenix wrote:Was what Snape felt love?
What about Bellatrix? Does she love Voldemort?
Does Cho love Harry, or does she just miss Cedric?
How about Lavander and Ron?

All of these questionable pairings and more can be discussed here, and what I'm really curious of is this. In your own words, how would you describe love? What is love? (not what it isn't)


Yes. Snape felt love...but it was transformed into somethong completely unhealthy after Lily died. It became obsession. He never healed. He never noved on.

Cho was a teenager. Im sure she did love Harry and Cedric in her way...but its not like he was IN LOVE, you know what I mean. We all feel a certain amount of love for people around us: friends, family, lovers, and life long mates. But there js a difference between all of that. I clearly dont love my sister or my kids the same way I love my wife.

Ron and Lavender were more in lust then in love.

Bellatrix is in love with Voldemort...and somewhere deep inside, he loves her too.


If you want to see selfless romantic love on Harry Potter...its not Snape and Lily, its Harry and Ginny.
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Post October 1st, 2017, 3:46 am

Re: Define "Love"

GinChaser wrote:Snape did not love Lily platonically. Lily loved Snape platonically.

There's a really long line of reasoning involved in that theory that I can't say I really agree with.

The definition of love can certainly be subjective, but I guess I would define it as a devotion to someone you cherish in one way or another, and the desire to protect them from physical and emotional harm.. Or something like that xD

I think obsession refers to something similar, but more twisted than love.
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Post October 1st, 2017, 6:28 am

Re: Define "Love"

Wun Wun wrote:
GinChaser wrote:Snape did not love Lily platonically. Lily loved Snape platonically.

There's a really long line of reasoning involved in that theory that I can't say I really agree with.

The definition of love can certainly be subjective, but I guess I would define it as a devotion to someone you cherish in one way or another, and the desire to protect them from physical and emotional harm.. Or something like that xD

I think obsession refers to something similar, but more twisted than love.


He wanted her romantically. Thats not platonic love. Lily only loved him as a friend.

Factually, I don't think there is anything incorrect there.
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Post October 1st, 2017, 7:49 am

Re: Define "Love"

ah. I was referring to the idea that 'snape loved lily platonically'. There's a lengthy reason why people agree with that. I don't. I agree with you. Snape loved Lily romantically.
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Post October 4th, 2017, 5:29 am

Re: Define "Love"

Assassin wrote:ah. I was referring to the idea that 'snape loved lily platonically'. There's a lengthy reason why people agree with that. I don't. I agree with you. Snape loved Lily romantically.


He totally wanted a piece of that muggle born ass.
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Post October 6th, 2017, 5:53 am

Re: Define "Love"

GinChaser wrote:
Assassin wrote:ah. I was referring to the idea that 'snape loved lily platonically'. There's a lengthy reason why people agree with that. I don't. I agree with you. Snape loved Lily romantically.


He totally wanted a piece of that muggle born ass.

Not after she died, I would hope.
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Post October 11th, 2017, 4:21 pm

Re: Define "Love"

Its snape. Wouldnt put it past him.
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Post October 16th, 2017, 6:38 am

Re: Define "Love"

I've got an idea of how you think he loved her. Sadly, I can't say I agree with you.
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Post October 18th, 2017, 7:39 pm

Re: Define "Love"

If it wasnt obvious...that was a joke.

But I am not incorrect in saying that he wanted her.
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Post October 22nd, 2017, 6:05 am

Re: Define "Love"

GellertGPhoenix wrote:In your own words, how would you describe love? What is love? (not what it isn't)

In my own words, love is a feeling of affection with a desire of possession.
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Post October 23rd, 2017, 5:16 pm

Re: Define "Love"

Monox D. I-Fly wrote:
GellertGPhoenix wrote:In your own words, how would you describe love? What is love? (not what it isn't)

In my own words, love is a feeling of affection with a desire of possession.


Your single arent you
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Post November 6th, 2017, 2:58 pm

Re: Define "Love"

If you look up "love" in the dictionary, you will see a picture of Lavender Brown. :love:
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Post November 6th, 2017, 9:50 pm

Re: Define "Love"

Maybe in Websters, but not in the OED.
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Post November 7th, 2017, 12:19 am

Re: Define "Love"

Haley wrote:If you look up "love" in the dictionary, you will see a picture of Lavender Brown. :love:


Im assuming that you, as well, are single.
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Ozarkas

Muggle
Muggle

Posts: 12

Joined: October 28th, 2017, 8:59 pm

Gender: Female

Post November 7th, 2017, 4:51 am

Re: Define "Love"

I think Snape loved Lily, but it was only because she was the only one who was ever nice to him. I think his love was genuine as he did try to help Harry and he never did anything to break up Lily and James even if he wanted to (like slipping love potion to Lily). He kept his distance and accepted it but was bitter about it. That's still real love. Bellatrix loved Voldemort's power and the ideals he represented, but not the real him. At that point, though, Tom Riddle (the real him) was long gone. She would reject him for being a half-blood, anyway. Lavender and Ron had nothing but a silly short-term teenage romance and Cedric and Cho might have had something real, but he died so it never blossomed into what it could have been.

Real love is selfless and puts the other person first and wants what is truly best for them. Real love is deep affection for someone else. Merope Gaunt and Tom Riddle Senior did not have real, genuine love for each other which is why Voldemort is said to have come from a loveless union. Compare Merope's actions (drugging her "husband" with love potion for months to keep him, even though he was seen riding with another girl in Ogden's memory) to that of other characters' love for each other.
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Haley

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Haley
Haley

Posts: 13873

Joined: February 12th, 2008, 4:54 pm

Location: Los Angeles, CA

Gender: Female

Post November 7th, 2017, 4:58 am

Re: Define "Love"

GinChaser wrote:
Haley wrote:If you look up "love" in the dictionary, you will see a picture of Lavender Brown. :love:


Im assuming that you, as well, are single.


Nah, lol.
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